Home » Blue Angels Schedule » Don’t look down! Stomach-churning view from on board a Blue Angels plane as it spins 360 DEGREES
Blue Angels Schedule

Don’t look down! Stomach-churning view from on board a Blue Angels plane as it spins 360 DEGREES

A stomach-churning video has been released from on board a Blue Angels plane as it speeds through a demonstration at break-neck speed
  • The video was filmed at Naval Air Weapons Station in China Lake, California
  • The F/A-18 Hornet speeds along the runway and takes off into the skies
  • The clip was filmed by Stan Jones, 51, who is stationed at the base 
  • The plane can be seen hurtling through the air and performing a 360 degree spin

A stomach-churning video has been released from on board a Blue Angels plane as it speeds through a demonstration at break-neck speed.

In the video, filmed at Naval Air Weapons Station, in China Lake, California, the in-flight camera shows a view of the cockpit as the plane prepares for take-off.

The F/A-18 Hornet then speeds along the runway and takes off into the skies in formation with other aircraft.

 

The clip was filmed by Stan Jones, 51, who is stationed at the base.  

In the video, the F/A-18 Hornet, which has a top speed of 1,190 mph, can be seen hurtling through the air and performing a 360 degree spin.

The Blue Angels formed in 1946 and are the second-oldest formal flight aerobatic team after the French Patrouille de France.

The pilots are known for flying in a tight diamond formation and partake in more than 70 shows in a number of locations around America each year.

They are currently using the F/A-18 Hornet, which had been in service with the US Navy, but had logged too many hours to continue as carrier-based aircraft.

Once handed over to the Blue Angels, several modifications are made to the aircraft, including the removal of the nose cannon. It is replaced with a smoke-fluid system. Changes are also made to the control system, to make it more suitable for precision flying.

The jets are also given their new blue paint scheme.

However, despite their modifications, they can return to duty on an aircraft carrier within 72 hours.

The job of piloting in the Blue Angels does not come without risk however, as throughout its history, 27 pilots have been killed in air show or training accidents.

 

%d bloggers like this: